Category Archives: Site Reliability Engineering

[Recommended Reading] Kubernetes

Source: Kubernetes Wikipedia

“Kubernetes (commonly stylized as K8s) is an open-source container-orchestration system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications. It was originally designed by Google and is now maintained by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. It aims to provide a “platform for automating deployment, scaling, and operations of application containers across clusters of hosts”. It works with a range of container tools, including Docker. Read more…

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Filed under Recommendations, Site Reliability Engineering, WorldOfSecDevOps

[Recommended Reading] Microsoft Azure

Source: Microsoft Azure Wikipedia

“Microsoft Azure (formerly Windows Azure) is a cloud computing service created by Microsoft for building, testing, deploying, and managing applications and services through a global network of Microsoft-managed data centers. It provides software as a service (SaaS)platform as a service (PaaS) and infrastructure as a service (IaaS) and supports many different programming languages, tools and frameworks, including both Microsoft-specific and third-party software and systems. Read more…

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[Recommended Reading] Apache HBASE

Source: Apache HBASE Wikipedia

HBase is an open-source, non-relational, distributed database modeled after Google’s Bigtable and is written in Java. It is developed as part of Apache Software Foundation’s Apache Hadoop project and runs on top of HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System), providing Bigtable-like capabilities for Hadoop. That is, it provides a fault-tolerant way of storing large quantities of sparse data (small amounts of information caught within a large collection of empty or unimportant data, such as finding the 50 largest items in a group of 2 billion records, or finding the non-zero items representing less than 0.1% of a huge collection).” Read more…

 

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Filed under Recommendations, Site Reliability Engineering